Illinois Runs / Bank of America Chicago Marathon Training Program

Weekly Training Tips Page

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Tips for the Week of 12-08-2008

Tips for the Week of 12-01-2008

Tips for the Week of 11-24-2008

Tips for the Week of 11-17-2008

Tips for the Week of 11-10-2008

Tips for the Week of 11-03-2008

Tips for the Week of 10-27-2008

Tips for the Week of 10-20-2008

Tips for the Week of 10-13-2008

Tips for the Week of 10-06-2008

Tips for the Week of 09-29-2008

Tips for the Week of 09-22-2008

Tips for the Week of 09-15-2008

Tips for the Week of 09-08-2008

Tips for the Week of 09-01-2008

Tips for the Week of 08-25-2008

Tips for the Week of 08-18-2008

Tips for the Week of 08-11-2008

Tips for the Week of 08-04-2008

Tips for the Week of 07-28-2008

Tips for the Week of 07-21-2008

Tips for the Week of 07-14-2008

Tips for the Week of 07-07-2008

Tips for the Week of 06-30-2008

Tips for the Week of 06-23-2008

Tips for the Week of 06-16-2008

Tips for the Week of 06-09-2008

Tips for the Week of 06-02-2008

Tips for the Week of 05-26-2008

Tips for the Week of 05-19-2008

Tips for the Week of 05-12-2008

Tips for the Week of 05-05-2008

Tips for the Week of 04-28-2008

Tips for the Week of 04-21-2008

Tips for the Week of 04-14-2008

 


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 12-08-2008

 

End of the Year

 

The 2008 season is winding down.These will be the final weekly tips for the year.

 

In the mean time, enjoy the holidays.But also squeeze some runs in between the parties, family get-togethers, and vacations.Youíve worked hard all year to build that base.Donít let it disappear over the month of December.Hopefully, if you havenít already done so, youíll keep up your running with your group.

 

The following schedule can be used as a template for any week during the off-season.Pick and choose the workouts, but try to get in at least 15 miles of running per week.

 

Off SeasonWeek

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

12/08/08

12/09/09

12/10/08

12/11/08

12/12/08

12/13/08

12/14/08

Total Weekly Miles

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

4 Miles Tempo or Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 - 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 - 23

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

8 to 9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24 Ė 27

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

10 Miles Easy

Cross Train

27 - 29

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into the final week of the Second Chance program.A few short runs are scheduled at the beginning of the week to take the edge off your pre-race anxiety.Then itís plenty of rest.Good Luck.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for this week.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

Week 1 / 8

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

12/8/08

12/9/08

12/10/08

12/11/08

12/12/08

12/13/08

12/14/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

2 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

2 Miles Easy

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

33

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

2 Miles Easy

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

34

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

36

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

3 Miles Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

37

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

3 Miles Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

38

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

Thereís a short tempo run, recovery run, and pace run on the schedule.With these three short workouts and the marathon, youíll end up with over 35 miles for the week.††

 

3-4 Mile Tempo Run

 

Mile 1: Long Run Pace

Mile 2: Lactate Threshold Pace

Mile 3: Lactate Threshold Pace

Mile 4: Long Run Pace


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 12-01-2008

 

Planning for 2009

 

Some of you may still have a December marathon or a frosty 5K coming up but for most runners the 2008 season is coming to an end.How did you do?If youíre one of those runners who keep a detailed training log, then youíre probably already reviewing your 2008 results, totaling up your annual miles, and making comparisons to previous years.

 

Itís not too early to start planning for 2009.Setting training goals, selecting specific races to run, and determining target race times are all great motivators for keeping up your training during the winter.††††

 

Training Goals

 

Training goals for marathon runners usually relate to weekly mileage and the length or pace of the workouts.For example, runners who have just completed their first marathon may set a goal of going into the 2009 summer marathon program with a weekly mileage base of 25 miles and a long run distance of 8 miles.These would be increases over the 20 miles per week base and the 6 mile long run distance that they had going into the 2008 program.††

 

Training goals can also relate to non-running areas. If you havenít incorporated strength training exercises into your regimen, then starting them in 2009 would be a great goal.They will benefit any level of runner.If youíre looking for faster times, then inserting a speed training workout into your weekly schedule is a must.If youíre already doing these workouts, then increases in repetitions and intensity should be goals.

 

2009 may be the year to expand into other sports.Consider joining a masters swim club, entering and training for a cross-country ski race, working your way up to a century bike ride, or trying your first triathlon.

 

Specific Races

 

Start picking the specific races that you would like to run in 2009.Then, you can work backwards to create training schedules for those races.Weíve recommended the following websites before.They both have calendars with races well into 2009.

 

The Chicago Athlete calendar has all kinds of sporting events, but you can limit the search to just running races.You can also select races by region and date.

††††

http://www.chicagoaa.com/calendar/smu.html

 

 

 

The Marathon Guide has calendars for both US and international races.They also have an interactive map that allows you to point and click on races in a region.If youíre hooked on marathons, then you already know that running in races outside the Chicago area can make for a great start or end to a vacation and are a good way to explore other cities and regions.

 

http://www.marathonguide.com

 

 

 

Target Race Times

 

If youíve followed our program before, then you know that the first step that we ask runners to take is to establish a target race time.Based on this target, runners can then determine the types of workouts that are needed.They can also determine the distance and pace of each training run.The key to this exercise is to choose a realistic time goal.Based on your most recent race performance, you can set a preliminary goal of perhaps a 5 to 15 percent decrease in your finishing time by next fall.If your training goes well, you can always adjust your target time later in the year.Also, keep in mind that runners who are new to marathoning typically see greater improvement in their finishing times than the more experienced runners.Many experienced runners improve to a point where they ďplateauĒ and the improvements in finishing time are harder to achieve.

 

The following schedule can be used a template for any week during the off-season.Pick and choose the workouts, but try to get in at least 15 miles of running per week.

 

 

Off SeasonWeek

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

12/01/08

12/02/08

12/03/08

12/04/08

12/05/08

12/06/08

12/07/08

Total Weekly Miles

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

4 Miles Tempo or Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 - 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 - 23

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

8 to 9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24 Ė 27

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

10 Miles Easy

Cross Train

27 - 29

 

 

 

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 7 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.This weekís schedule is identical to the one that was posted two weeks before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.††

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

There is less than a week to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 6-7.If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

Week 2 / 7

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

12/01/08

12/02/08

12/03/08

12/04/08

12/05/08

12/06/08

12/07/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

21

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

23

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

25 to 26

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

26 to 30

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

27 to 31

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be a short tempo run.Weíre tapering and some of you will be coming off a 10K race over the weekend.Weíre cutting back on distance, but maintaining some of the intensity.

 

5 Mile Tempo Run

 

Mile 1: Long Run Pace

Mile 2: Target Marathon Pace.

Mile 3: 20 Seconds Fast than Marathon Pace

Mile 4: Lactate Threshold Pace, (20 Seconds Faster)

Mile 5: Long Run Pace.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 11-24-2008

 

Racing and Speed Training

 

Happy Thanksgiving!Why not start out the day with a Turkey Trot.Youíve rested after the marathon and slowly built up your weekly mileage and long run distance.You should be able turn in a fairly decent race performance.The forecast calls for sunshine and a high temperature of 41 degrees.So unless you live in the Indiana snow belt, it should be a good day to run.At a minimum, go out for a morning run.That will provide minimal justification for the several thousand calories that you will be consuming later in the day.

 

If you donít have access to a treadmill or indoor track, you may be having trouble getting in that speed workout.If so, try moving it to the weekend when you can run when itís light out.Since your weekend long run is a moderate distance and done at a slower pace, you shouldnít have a problem doing the speed workout on the other weekend day.

 

The following schedule can be used a template for any week during the off-season.Pick and choose the workouts, but try to get in at least 15 miles of running per week.

 

Off SeasonWeek

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/24/08

11/25/08

11/26/08

11/27/08

11/28/08

11/29/08

11/30/08

Total Weekly Miles

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

4 Miles Tempo or Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 - 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 - 23

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

8 to 9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24 Ė 27

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

10 Miles Easy

Cross Train

27 - 29

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 6 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.This weekís schedule is identical to the one that was posted three weeks before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.††

 

The taper has started.The focus of the next two or three weeks will be on pace work and rest (cut backs in mileage and intensity).You can also continue with strength workouts and cross-training. The experienced runners should also continue with some limited speed work, and possibly run a predictor 10K race on Thanksgiving or this coming weekend.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

There are two weeks to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 6, 7.If you are running your marathon that weekend, then you should shorten the long run this weekend to 8 miles and do very few miles next week.

 

If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

 

Week 3 / 6

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/24/08

11/25/08

11/26/08

11/27/08

11/28/08

11/29/08

11/30/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

28

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

30

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 8 x 200M Hill

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

25 to 30

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

12 x 200M Hill

Rest

8Miles Pace

Rest

10K Race or 12Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

25 to 33

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

16 x 200M Hill

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

10K Race or 12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

27 to 35

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

The speed workout this week will be an interval workout of short hills.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at long run pace.Take a short rest. Do some light, active stretching.

 

Run 3 sets of 4 x 200 meter hill at 5K race pace.This is a continuous run.At the bottom of the hill you start right into your next uphill repeat.After the fourth repeat, take a 3 minute break.Get water during the break.

 

The veteran marathoners may choose to do a fourth set.

 

End the workout with a one mile cool-down at long run pace.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 11-17-2008

 

No ZMWís

 

As was mentioned last week, youíre now in the part of the year when you should focus on maintaining your base mileage and long run distance.Depending on your winter and spring race schedule, this period could last anywhere from one month to several months.A typical week might include several shorter runs, a slightly longer weekend run, core strength workouts, cross training, and possibly a shorter distance speed workout.Because of the weather conditions, a tempo run is the easiest speed workout to do outside in the winter.Inside, on a track or treadmill, you can add more variety to your speed workouts.

 

With the shorter days, colder weather, and holiday conflicts your incentive to work out is going to be diminished.The one thing you want to avoid is a ZMW or Zero Mileage Week.Itís natural to want to cut back after pushing yourself all summer, but skipping workouts can become habit forming.Itís pretty discouraging to have to record a zero in your running log and it will make it that much harder to start back up in the spring.

 

You should be able to squeeze in at least three runs a week.Join a running club.The clubs usually have group runs on the weekend and one weekday evening.Having a group to run with will increase the likelihood that youíll make it out the door.

 

The following schedule can be used a template for any week during the off-season.Pick and choose the workouts, but try to get in at least 15 miles of running per week.

 

Off SeasonWeek

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/17/08

11/18/08

11/19/08

11/20/08

11/21/08

11/22/08

11/23/08

Total Weekly Miles

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

4 Miles Tempo or Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 - 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 - 23

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

8 to 9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24 Ė 27

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

10 Miles Easy

Cross Train

27 - 29

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 5 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.This weekís schedule is identical to the one that was posted four weeks before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.†† Keep in mind the previous warnings about weekly mileage above 40 miles.With the greater weekly mileage comes a greater risk of injury from over-training.Higher weekly mileage does play a factor in achieving optimal race performance.However, you can still run a successful marathon on 40 to 45 miles per week.

 

There are three weeks to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 6, 7.There are four weeks to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 13, 14.This week is the last build week.The taper begins next week.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

If you are running your marathon the following weekend, then you should shorten the long run to 8 miles.

 

Week 4 / 5

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/17/08

11/18/08

11/19/08

11/20/08

11/21/08

11/22/08

11/23/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

10 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

38

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

6 Miles Easy

Rest

10 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

41

2nd Timer

5 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 8 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 Miles Pace

4 Miles Easy

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

45

Experienced Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

12 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 Ė 11Miles Pace

5Miles Easy

20 - 22Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

46 to 53

Veteran Marathoner

7 Miles Easy

16 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 - 13 Miles Pace

6 Miles Easy

20 - 23 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

49 to 60

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout is 1/4 mile repeats at 5K or mile race pace.This is a shorter workout.You should be able to complete 12 quarters, regardless of your weekly mileage.Veteran Marathoners can run 16.Be careful with the pace though, the rest interval is very short.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up and some stretching.

 

The quarters will be run in 3 sets of 4 repeats.

 

Follow the first, second, and third quarters in each set with a one-minute rest interval.Follow the fourth repeat with a slightly longer rest and a water break, before starting the next set.

 

Finish the workout with a one-mile cool down.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 11-10-2008

 

Back to Normal

 

After four weeks of recovery, you should now be back to same or slightly higher weekly mileage that you had in June.First Timers are now Second Timers with weekly mileage in the low 20ís.Second Timers may have set a PR and have weekly mileage in the mid 20ís.And experienced runners may have qualified for Boston and have weekly mileage in the high 20ís.

 

Unless you have a winter or spring marathon in mind, youíve entered a period of training where youíll probably want to coast for a while.Youíve just come off a significant time commitment and physical effort.The weather is getting colder and the days are getting shorter.There are fewer races scheduled and weekends start to get filled up with holiday activities.Because of these factors itís going to be harder to stay motivated and schedule your workouts.

 

However, you shouldnít shut down your training completely.At a minimum, you should be focusing on maintaining your base mileage and weekend long run distance.This shouldnít be too difficult.Youíve already built both of these back up to June levels.By running just 3 or 4 times a week, you should be able to average at least 18 miles per week.

 

With the recovery over, you may want to resume your speed training and try some late fall races.

 

Now is also the time to resume your core strength workouts.If these workouts havenít been part of your training regimen, then itís the perfect time to try them.A short running warm-up followed by core strength exercises is an easy workout to fit in.You donít need special equipment and the exercises can be performed indoors.Here is the workout that personal trainer J.P. Bordeleau put together for our group.

 

JPís Workout

 

No equipment is necessary for this workout.It can be performed inside or out on the running path.It begins with a series of warm-up exercises that are described in written detail (and Quicktime videos) at the Verstegen core performance link:

 

http://www.coreperformance.com/movement/workouts/A_Better_Warm-up.html

 

They include Knee Hug, Leg Over, Glute Bridge-Marching, Walking Quadriceps Stretch, Forward Lunge + Twist, Hip External Rotation-Sidelying and Lateral Side Squat.Each of these exercises is performed 6 times.

 

These warm-ups are followed by the following bodyweight core exercises described in written detail and photographs at the above Pfitzinger link:

 

http://www.pfitzinger.com/cc.shtml#top

 

 

Prone Plank:†† Hold the position for 10-60 seconds (or until body shakes) and repeat once more.If able, perform the advanced version with one leg off ground, once for each.

 

Side Hover (or side plank): Hold the position for up to 20 seconds and repeat once more on each side.If able, perform the advanced variations as well.

 

Bodyweight High Bridge: 8-10 repetitions holding for 5 seconds in the high bride position. If able, perform the advance variations as well.

 

Add the following two exercises from http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/corestabex.htm

 

Superman:Hold each for 20 seconds.Perform 5 sets

 

Sidelying Hip Abduction: Perform 2 sets of 20 repetitions

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for this week.The First-Timers from this year should be now be training as Second Timers.Strength and speed workouts have been resumed and can be considered optional.This weekís schedule can be used a template for all weeks during this period of training.You may want to vary the types of speed work, but the tempo run is the easiest to do outdoors during colder weather or indoors on a treadmill. The main focus should be on maintaining your base mileage.

 

 

Post Week 5

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/10/08

11/11/08

11/12/08

11/13/08

11/14/08

11/15/08

11/16/08

Total Weekly Miles

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

4 Miles Tempo or Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 - 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 - 23

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

8 to 9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24 Ė 27

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

10 Miles Easy

Cross Train

27 - 29

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 4 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.

 

There are four weeks to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 6, 7.There are five weeks to go until the marathons that are scheduled for the weekend of December 13, 14.This week is a rest week.†† Next week is the last tough week.Then the taper begins.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

If you are running your marathon the following weekend, then you should shorten the long run to 8 miles.

 

The following cautions are worth repeating.You should only be considering this schedule if you did not run the Chicago Marathon all out.If you are still feeling tired and sore, then stay with the schedules that are listed at the beginning of these tips, or replace running workouts with rest and cross training.

 

 

Week 5 / 4

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/10/08

11/11/08

11/12/08

11/13/08

11/14/08

11/15/08

11/16/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

29

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

31

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 6 x Half Mile

Rest

9 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy or Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

31 to 34

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

10 x Half Mile

Rest

9 Ė 10Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy or Rest

12Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

33 to 41

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

12 x Half Mile

Rest

10 - 12 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy or Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

36 to 46

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

Itís a rest week, but the speed workout is tough and long:10-12 half-mile repeats at 10K pace.This workout is based on the Yasso 800ís.Check out the description of this workout at the Runners World web site.

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-244-255-624-0,00.html

 

This workout can also be used as a marathon predictor by adding a couple of zeros to end of your average split for the half-mile repeats.For example, if you average 4:00 minutes for your splits, then itís predicted that you should be able to run 4:00:00 (four hours) for the marathon. If you can make it through at least 10 half-mile repeats and youíve been doing okay on your long runs and pace runs, you should feel fairly confident about your marathon target time.

 

We will run a modified version of this workout.The rest interval is shorter and some of the experienced runners may do 12 repeats instead of 10.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at long run pace.Take a short rest and do some light, active stretching.

 

Base the number of half-mile repeats that you run on your weekly mileage.

 

35 miles per week: 6 to 8

36 to 45 miles per week 8 to 10

Over 45 miles per week: 10 to 12

 

Take a 1:30 rest between repeats.Take a slightly longer rest and get water after each set of 4.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 11-3-2008

 

One More Week of Recovery

 

Youíre probably starting to feel pretty good after three weeks of low, easy mileage.Take it easy for a least one more week, just to be safe.Next week you can consider resuming some harder workouts and even a race.While they are not listed, itís not too early to resume some core strength workouts.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week, if you ran the marathon all out.

 

Post Week 4

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/03/08

11/04/08

11/05/08

11/06/08

11/07/08

11/08/08

11/09/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

Cross Train

18

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

Cross Train

19

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

7 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

7 to 8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

23 to 24

Veteran Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

Cross Train

26

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 3 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.

 

Itís a build week and the distance of the long run is back into the 18 to 20 mile range.While the weather is significantly cooler than this summer, the long runs should still be done at a slow, easy pace.For experienced marathoners, this pace should be 30 to 60 seconds slower than your marathon target pace.Donít get carried away and leave your best efforts out on the path.

 

The weekly mileage for some runners is now over 40 miles again.As we mentioned earlier this year, with the greater weekly mileage comes a greater risk of injury.Higher weekly mileage does play a factor in optimal race performance.However, you can still run a successful marathon on 40 to 45 miles per week.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

If you are running your marathon the following weekend, then you should shorten the long run to 8 miles.

 

The following cautions are worth repeating.You should only be considering this schedule if you did not run the Chicago Marathon all out.If you are still feeling tired and sore, then stay with the schedules that are listed at the beginning of these tips, or replace running workouts with rest and cross training.

 

 

Week 6 / 3

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

11/03/08

11/04/08

11/05/08

11/06/08

11/07/08

11/08/08

11/09/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

18 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

31 to 35

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

18 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

32 to 37

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 Miles Easy or include 3 X Mile

Rest

9 Miles Pace

3 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

38 to 42

Experienced Marathoner

4 Miles Easy

5 x Mile

Rest

9 Ė 10Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy or Rest

20Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

40 to 48

Veteran Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

6 x Mile

Rest

10 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy or Rest

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

43 to 51

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be mile repeats that will vary between Lactate Threshold pace and 10K Race Pace.If you are running this workout in the evening, select a course that is well-lit and has good footing.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at an easy pace.Take a short rest. Do some light, active stretching.

 

Mile Repeat 1: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 2: 10K Race Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 3: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 4: 10K Race Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 5: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 6: 10K Race Pace

 

Finish with a one-mile cool-down at an easy pace.

 

Base the number of mile repeats you run on your weekly mileage.

 

Low thirties: First 3 repeats.

Mid thirties: First 4 repeats.

40 Ė 45 Miles: First 5 repeats.

Over 45 Miles: All 6 repeats.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 10-27-2008

 

Gradual Return to Higher Mileage

 

Your legs are probably still a little stiff and sore.You wonít have that spring back in your step for a while.†† This week, extend a couple of your runs by one mile.Itís still all easy running during this recovery period.Even if youíre feeling good, stay away from speed workouts and racing for a few more weeks.

 

Running the marathon wreaks havoc on your immune system.Itís also the start of cold and flu season.Sleep, hydration, and good nutrition are especially important during the recovery period.Getting a flu shot isnít bad idea either.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week, if you ran the marathon all out.

 

Post Week 3

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/27/08

10/28/08

10/29/08

10/30/08

10/31/08

11/1/08

11/2/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Cross Train

17

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Cross Train

17

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

Cross Train

19

Experienced Marathoner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 to 7 Miles Easy

Cross Train

20 to 21

Veteran Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

7 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Cross Train

24

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

Weíre into week 2 of the program which will prepare you for another marathon this year.And itís already a rest week.If youíre unfamiliar with this program, check out last weekís tips.

 

If you havenít already noticed, there isnít anybody out on the path passing out Gatorade.And in some areas, the drinking fountains have been or will soon be turned off.This means that you will have to bring your own replenishment fluids.If you donít own one, purchase a bottle belt that can be used to carry water and Gatorade on your long runs.We suggest the kind that has several smaller bottles.This enables you to carry more than one type of fluid and the weight is distributed better around your waist.Nathan and Fuel Belt are two of the major brands.

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

Once again, you should only be considering this schedule if you did not run the Chicago Marathon all out.If you are still feeling tired and sore, then stay with the schedules that are listed at the beginning of these tips, or replace running workouts with rest and cross training.

 

If you are running your marathon this weekend, then do only a few short runs in the beginning of the week and take 3 or 4 days off before the race.

 

If you are running your marathon the following weekend, then you should shorten the long run to 8 miles.

 

Week 7 / 2

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/27/08

10/28/08

10/29/08

10/30/08

10/31/08

11/1/08

11/2/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

20 to 27

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

Rest

8 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

20 to 28

2nd Timer

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

5 Miles Easy or include 4 X Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

25 to 28

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

2 x Half Mile, One Mile, 2 x Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

12Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

27 to 31

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

2 x Half Mile, One Mile, 2 x Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

28 to 32

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be a mix of long intervals.It will include a set of Ĺ mile repeats, a one-mile run, and a second set of Ĺ mile repeats.

 

Unless you can do this workout during the day, you will need to find a well-lit course on which to run.If you can get onto a high school track, that would be optimal.Otherwise, find a section of the running path that has suitable conditions and has marked mileage.The workout can also be done indoors on a treadmill.As the weather gets colder, you may choose that option anyway.As a last resort, replace the workout with a tempo or fartlek run.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at an easy pace.

 

Follow this with a set of 2 half-miles at 10K pace.Take a 1:30 minute break between repeats.†† Take a 3-minute break after the second half-mile.

 

Next, run one mile at Lactate Threshold (LT) pace.For a quick estimation of your LT pace for one mile, double your earlier half-mile split and add 15 to 20 seconds.Follow the mile with another 3 minute break.

 

Next, run another set of 2 half-miles at 10K pace with a 1:30 minute rest between repeats.

 

Finish the workout with a one-mile cool-down.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 10-20-2008

 

Continued Rest & Recovery

 

Hopefully, youíre getting back into the swing of things.If you ran Chicago as an all out effort then you should be focusing on continued rest and recovery for the next several weeks.†† Over the next month, you should gradually build your weekly mileage back to somewhere between 20 and 30 miles, and your long run distance to between 5 and 10 miles.Choose a level of training that you are comfortable with and that you can maintain consistently through the end of the year.This is also a good time to focus on some low-impact cross training and core strength exercises.

 

A common prescription for recovery from a race is one day of recovery for every mile raced.Therefore, in the case of the marathon the recovery period is about 4 weeks.Sometime in November, you can consider returning to some harder workouts.†† You might also want to run a shorter race, such as a 5K or 10K later in the November.

 

If you continue running at an I-Run site or with a local club, you should have no problem finding training partners.It seems that during the off-season, the post-race breakfast is a higher priority than the training.Youíve been pounding the pavement all summer and fall.Cut back on the mileage and enjoy the rest.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week, if you ran the marathon all out.

 

Post Week 2

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/20/08

10/21/08

10/22/08

10/23/08

10/24/08

10/25/08

10/26/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

Cross Train

15

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

Cross Train

15

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

Rest

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

Cross Train

16

Experienced Marathoner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

5 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

5 to 6 Miles Easy

Cross Train

17 to 18

Veteran Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

7 Miles Easy

Cross Train

21

 

Second Chance Marathon

 

If you skipped the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, or intentionally slowed your pace significantly and treated it as a long training run, then you may want to consider trying another marathon this fall or winter.Below is a training schedule that will prepare you for another race this year.This schedule will point towards marathons during the first two weeks of December.If you choose a marathon on the weekend of December 6-7, then it will be a 7-week schedule with a 2-week taper.If you choose a marathon on the weekend of December 13-14 then it will be an 8-week schedule, with a 3-week taper.The focus of the training will be to gradually rebuild your weekly mileage and to complete one or two additional 20-mile runs.

 

If you end up selecting a marathon to run before December, then follow the schedule until two weeks before your race and then take a 2-week taper.Scale back your weekly mileage significantly and make your last long run, the week-end before, an 8-miler.The week of the marathon run a couple of short runs early in the week and take 2, 3, or 4 days of rest before the race.

 

If you are looking for a new and different challenge, then consider the Chicago 50K / 50 Miler on Saturday, November 1.This field is limited to 300 entrants, so if youíre interested then register early.Check it out at http://www.chicagoultra.org .

 

If you end up selecting a marathon to run after the first of the year, then follow the post- race schedule that is listed above, gradually rebuilding your long run distance and weekly mileage.When you reach 12 weeks prior to your event, use the same I-Run training schedules for weeks 12 down through 1 (marathon week) that were used this summer.

 

The following is a look at the long run schedule and a list of possible marathons.For a more complete list of marathons check out the calendar at

 

http://www.marathonguide.com

 

Long Run Mileage Progression & Late Fall Marathons

 

Week

Start Date

(Monday)

Long Run

Distance

Weekly Mileage

Marathons This Week

8 / 1

10/20/08

14 Ė 16

1st Timer 22 Ė 30

2nd Timer 29 Ė 34

Experienced 34 Ė 39

Veteran 35 Ė 40

Niagara Falls, 10/26/08

Marine Corps, 10/26/08

 

 

7 / 2

10/27/08

12

Cut Back

Chicago Ultra, 11/01/08

Indy Classic, 11/01/08

New York City, 11/02/08

6 / 3

11/03/08

18 - 20

Build

Harrisburg, 11/9/08

5 / 4

11/10/08

12

Cut Back

Richmond, 11/15/08

San Antonio, 11/16/08

4 / 5

11/17/08

20

Build

Nashville, 11/23/08

Philadelphia, 11/23/08

3 / 6

11/24/08

8 - 12

Taper

Atlanta, 11/27/08

Seattle, 11/30/08

2 / 7

12/01/08

8 or 26.2

Taper or Race

Kiawah Island, 12/06/08

Memphis, 12/06/08

Las Vegas, 12/07/08

Tucson, 12/07/08

1 / 8

12/08/08

26.2

Race

Rocket City, 12/13/08

Dallas, 12/14/08

Honolulu, 12/14/08

 

Below are the suggested workout schedules for runners who are looking to compete in another marathon this year.Stick with the category of runner in which you trained earlier this year.

 

The schedules are similar to the ones that were used 8 weeks prior to the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.You should only be considering this schedule if you did not run the Chicago Marathon all out.

 

 

Week 8 / 1

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/20/08

10/21/08

10/22/08

10/23/08

10/24/08

10/25/08

10/26/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

14 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

22 to 29

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

Rest

8 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy, Rest or Cross Train

Rest

14 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

22 to 30

2nd Timer

Rest,†† 2-3 Miles Easy, or Cross Train

7 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

14 to 16 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

29 to 34

Experienced Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

9 to 10 Miles Pace

Rest

16Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

34 to 39

Veteran Marathoner

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

10 Miles Pace

Rest

16 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

35 to 40

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout should look familiar.Itís the 7-mile ladder that we did during week 8 of the summer program.The pace will increase from Marathon Target to Lactate Threshold (up the ladder) and then decrease back (down the ladder) to Marathon Target Pace.If you are still feeling beat up from Chicago, then run the 7 miles at an easy pace, or shorten the run to 5 or 6 miles.

 

Mile 1: Long Run Pace, Warm Up

Mile 2: Marathon Target Pace

Mile 3: 15 to 20 Seconds Faster than Marathon Target

Mile 4: Lactate Threshold Pace

Mile 5: 15 to 20 Seconds Faster than Marathon Target

Mile 6: Marathon Target Pace

Mile 7: Long Run Pace, Cool Down

 


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 10-13-2008

 

Congratulations to all who ran on Sunday.It was a little warmer than we would have liked, but certainly not as bad as 2007.

 

Rest & Recovery

 

Thereís not much training advice for this week except to take some well-earned rest.Thereís really no reason to run the first part of this week.†† The schedule calls for easy 3-5 five mile runs later in the week.You can also continue with any cross-training and strength training that doesnít involve a lot of leg work.Walking and light stretching are good recovery exercises for Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

 

Continue to run throughout the fall and winter.Donít do anything strenuous in the next few weeks, but keep active going into the off-season.Sometimes runners stop training completely after the marathon, and then find it difficult to start up again in the winter or spring.

Resist the urge to run any races in the next four weeks.Even though the leg pain will go away after several days, thereís probably some muscle damage for which you need to allow time for repair.If you donít allow sufficient time for full recovery, you may end up with an injury.Around Thanksgiving, you might want to try one of the Turkey Trots.

 

First Timers

 

You probably now realize why we had you focus on just running comfortably rather than any particular time goal.The marathon is a tough and sometimes humbling event.You know youíve really accomplished something when you get done.You should be proud.You stuck with the 18-weeks (or more) of training and competed in your first marathon.

 

Contingency Marathon

 

If you didnít make your goal, donít be discouraged.As weíve said before, marathoning is a sport that requires lots of patience.There are so many variables that can affect race performance.

 

Earlier tips mentioned the need to have a contingency marathon, in case things didnít work out at Chicago.For those of you who werenít satisfied with your Chicago marathon performance, now is the time to go to that Plan B.If you ran hard on Sunday, be sure to allow for sufficient recovery.December may about the earliest that you should consider racing another marathon.It may involve some travel, but there are some great marathons to choose from at that time of the year.For those of you who held back at Chicago, a marathon in November or even late October may be possible.Check out next weekís tips for more information.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

 

Post Week 1

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/13/08

10/14/08

10/15/08

10/16/08

10/17/08

10/18/08

10/19/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

Rest

Rest

Rest

2 Miles Easy

Cross Train

3 Miles Easy

Cross Train

5

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

Rest

Rest

Rest

2 Miles Easy

Cross Train

3 Miles Easy

Cross Train

5

2nd Timer

Rest

Rest

Rest

3 Miles Easy

Cross Train

5 Miles Easy

Cross Train

8

Experienced Marathoner

Rest

Rest

Rest

3 Miles Easy

Cross Train

5 to 6 Miles Easy

Cross Train

8 to 9

Veteran Marathoner

Rest

Rest

Rest

3 Miles Easy

Cross Train

7 Miles Easy

Cross Train

10

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

Stay away from the speed workouts for a while.Take the recovery seriously.

 

If you qualified for Boston, check out the registration process on the Boston Athletic Associationís website: www.bostonmarathon.org .

 

Itís never too early to get your travel and hotel reservations.With 20,000 runners expected, everything will be filling up quickly.If rooms are still available and you donít mind spending more money, staying at a hotel near the finish line is the way to go.If you canít find anything or want someone else to do the work for you, check out one of the tour groups.These companies will have already reserved blocks of rooms at hotels at many price ranges and locations.

 

Hereís one of the first and largest tour companies:

 

http://www.marathontour.com/index.shtml

 

Look for a group to train with over the winter.Most, if not all, of the groups will continue to meet during the off-season.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 10-6-2008

 

Final week!Good Luck to all.

 

Last Bits of Advice

 

Here are a few important reminders.

 

Donít do anything that you havenít practiced during training.Race day is not the time to experiment.Youíve just spent 18 weeks perfecting what you plan to do on race day.

 

Make the last adjustments to your target time based on the weather.The long range forecast is calling for highs in the mid-fifties, with high-thirties at the start.If that forecast holds, itís going to be a good day to run.Be careful though.Once it gets above sixty degrees, you may have run at a slower pace than planned.

 

If itís in the thirties or forties on race day, then plan to wear some throw-away clothes to the start line.Have your support crew (family and friends) carry extra clothing in case you need it later in the race.Donít forget to set up your exact meeting places along the course.

 

Stick with your planned pace.Donít get carried away and start out too fast.The first few miles will set the tone for the race.We donít recommend a strategy of ďputting time in the bankĒ.Most of the elite marathoners will run the second half of the race slightly faster than the first half.In setting a new world record of 2:03:59 at the Berlin Marathon recently, Haile Gebrselassie ran 62:05 for the first half and 61:54 for the second half.Now thatís consistency.

 

Donít pass up the aid stations.Even though itís likely to be a cool day, staying hydrated is still an issue.The Gatorade and gels will help maintain your energy and electrolytes.

 

Develop a checklist of stuff that you might want to bring on race day.Start packing your bag now.Here are some suggestions.

 

Race Number

Timing Chip

Directions to race and parking information

Throw-away clothes to wear at the start if itís cold.

Garbage bag to be used as a poncho if itís raining at the start

Hat and gloves

Water bottle belt or fanny pack

Water bottle, Gatorade

Energy gels, hard candy

Body Glide or Vaseline

Band-aids, nip guards

Hair ties

Sunscreen

Lip balm

ID

Money

Watch

Disposable Camera

Sunglasses

Tissues

Safety pins (if you havenít already pinned your number on your shirt)

Towel

Change of socks, shoes, clothes for after the race

 

Check your gear at the Illinois Runs tent.The tent is the first place you are going to want to go after the race to get warm and change into dry clothes.Have your family and friends meet you there.

 

You might save this link for next week, Final Race Countdown and Marathon Strategy:


http://www.marathontraining.com/marathon/m_mday.html

First Timers

 

Your first goal has been achieved: You made it to the starting line well trained and healthy.This enables the achievement of your second goal on Sunday:Finish your first marathon safely and comfortably.†† Run a smart race.Stick with the comfortable pace that youíve practiced all summer long.Take your time and enjoy the day.†† Youíll have plenty of chances to improve on your finishing time in future marathons.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 1

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

10/6/08

10/7/08

10/8/08

10/9/08

10/10/08

10/11/08

10/12/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

2 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

2 Miles Easy

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

33

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

3 Miles Easy

2 Miles Easy

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

34

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

36

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

3 Miles Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

37

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

3 Miles Tempo

Rest

3 Miles Pace

Rest

Rest

26.2 Miles

38

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

Thereís a short tempo run, recovery run, and pace run on the schedule.With these three short workouts and the marathon, youíll end up with over 35 miles for the week.††

 

3-4 Mile Tempo Run

 

Mile 1: Long Run Pace

Mile 2: Lactate Threshold Pace

Mile 3: Lactate Threshold Pace

Mile 4: Long Run Pace


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 9-29-2008

 

Two weeks to go.†† Youíre probably getting antsy.Thatís normal during the taper period.Go on some shorter runs, but keep up the intensity to take the edge off your anxiety.

 

Cold and flu season is starting and your immune system is probably worn down from your training. Get lots of rest and sleep.Eat right and stay hydrated.Keep up the stretching to maintain your flexibility.††

 

Confidence

 

Itís normal to get nervous before the marathon.You may wonder if youíve trained enough.You want to be confident that youíve chosen a realistic marathon target time.A good way to build that confidence is to review your training log and race results and then reevaluate your marathon goal.

 

If youíve run a recent 10K (or even 5K) race, then you can go back to the tables in the Illinois Runs Workbook and determine a range of marathon finishing times that you should be considering.If you remember, we also did this exercise the first week of the program to determine the paces at which to run your workouts.Youíll end up with a range of marathon paces: faster (optimistic), mid-range, and slower.

 

Another quick way to estimate your marathon pace is to add one minute to your per-mile pace for a 10K race.For example, if you ran a 10K race in 50 minutes, then the per-mile pace was 8:03.By adding one minute, your estimated per mile pace for the marathon would be 9:03.That would bring you to the finish line in 3:57:30.This method works pretty well for anyone in the three to four hour range of finishing times.††††

 

If you raced a half marathon this summer or fall, then you can estimate your marathon finishing time by doubling your half marathon time and adding fifteen minutes.For example, if your half marathon finishing time was 1:45:00, then your marathon finishing time should be around 3:45:00.

 

You can also use the McMillan Running Calculator at www.mcmillanrunning.com.

Enter a recent race time (preferably a 10K to half-marathon).You will get predictions for various races, including the marathon.

 

If you didnít race recently, then another way to estimate your marathon finishing time is to review the results of the 12 times a half-mile workout that you did a few weeks ago.Calculate the average time that it took you to finish the half-mile repeats.Add two zeros to the right side to come up with a projected marathon time.For example, if your average half-mile split was 4:00 (4 minutes) then your projected marathon time would be 4:00:00 (4 hours).

 

Obviously, the accuracy of predicting marathon performance based on times for shorter distances is dependent on what you did during training.So the second step in this reevaluation process is to review your training log and adjust your marathon goal based on your findings.

†††††††††††††††††††††††

Check out the form at the bottom of these tips.Youíll find a list of variables that can affect your marathon performance.How many twenty milers did you do?How many miles per week did you average?Were you consistent with your speed and strength workouts?Were you comfortable on your longer pace runs?Have you had a recent injury or illness?Will you be running in a fairly fresh pair of shoes?(around 75 miles) Adjust your projected marathon time faster or slower based on each piece of information.

 

The final variable that can affect race performance will be the weather.Make any last minute adjustments to your target time on the morning of the race.If itís too cold, too warm, too humid, or even too windy you may have to plan on running a slower pace.If itís 40 degrees, not raining, and calm, then you will not have the weather as an excuse for a less-than-perfect race.

 

If you just have to know what the Chicago weather has been on October 12 over the last 10 years, check out this site.It looks like ideal running weather, but this is Chicago...you never know.

 

http://www.wunderground.com/history/airport/KMDW/1972/10/12/PlannerHistory.html?dayend=12&monthend=10&yearend=1972&req_city=Chicago&req_state=IL&req_statename=Illinois

 

First Timers

 

There are no calculations needed for estimation of your finishing time.You should plan on running the same relaxed, conservative pace that youíve maintained on your long runs.As we have stated often: your goal is to finish your first marathon.Time should not be an issue for you.

 

A frequently asked question by first time marathoners is ďHow can I expect to run 26.2 miles, when I have only run 20 miles in training?Ē

 

The first and most important reason is the taper.By cutting back on mileage and resting the final weeks before the race you are replenishing your energy stores and allowing your body to recover completely from the previous 15-16 weeks of hard training.

 

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is a big, exciting event.Youíre going to be pumped up.The adrenaline will be flowing.Youíll be motivated the entire 26.2 miles by the enthusiasm of your fellow runners and the support from spectators and volunteers.††

 

Youíll be putting in your maximum effort on race day.Unlike a training run, there is no tomorrow to consider.You will not be running again for a while; not on Monday, and maybe not at all during the following week.This is what youíve trained for.Itís the final test.

 

The weather on October 12 should work in your favor.While you trained all summer when it was in the 60ís, 70ís, and 80ís with high humidity, on race day it will probably be in the high 30ís or low 40ís with low humidity at the start.It may get into the mid 50ís or low 60ís by the time you finish.†† There are no guarantees, but those are the normal conditions for early October, and they are perfect for running.

 

And finally, a lot of what it takes to complete a marathon is mental.Think positive.†† Remember all of the training runs that you completed in the summer heat and humidity.The long runs were improving your conditioning, but they were also preparing you psychologically for the marathon.You just spent 18 weeks training for this race.Youíre going to have a successful and exciting marathon.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 2

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

9/29/08

9/30/08

10/1/08

10/2/08

10/3/08

10/4/08

10/5/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

3 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

21

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

6 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

23

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy or Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

25 to 26

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

26 to 30

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

5 Miles Tempo

Rest

6 Miles Pace

Strength 2-3 Miles Easy

8 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

27 to 31

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be a short tempo run.Weíre tapering and some of you will be coming off a 10K race over the weekend.Weíre cutting back on distance, but maintaining some of the intensity.

 

5 Mile Tempo Run

 

Mile 1: Long Run Pace

Mile 2: Target Marathon Pace.

Mile 3: 20 Seconds Fast than Marathon Pace

Mile 4: Lactate Threshold Pace, (20 Seconds Faster)

Mile 5: Long Run Pace.


†††††††††††††††††††††† Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

††††††††††† Work Sheet for Adjusting Marathon Pace Estimate

 

 

Mid-Range Marathon Target Time

 

 

 

 

 

Factor

 

Measurement

 

Rating

 

Adjustment

 

Number of 20 Milers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Run Pace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speed Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strength Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pace Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Highest Weekly Mileage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tapering Period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glycogen Level

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flu, Cold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Injury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race Day : Temperature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race Day : Humidity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race Day : Wind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race Day : Rain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Adjustment

 

 

 

 

AdjustedMarathon Target Time

 

 

 

1.†††††††† Record your Mid-Range Marathon Target Time that was based on your most recent race and time trial results.

 

2.†††††††† Enter a measurement for each line item based on your training log and the predicted race day weather conditions.Rate each item based on the criteria from the Checklist.Decide if an adjustment towards either your Fastest Marathon Target Time or your Slower Marathon Target time is needed.

 

3.†††††††† Add up the adjustments and apply them to the original Mid-Range Marathon Target.The Adjusted Marathon Target Time should be a fairly good predictor of your performance.†††


††††††††††††††††††† Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

††††††††††††† Checklist for Adjusting Marathon Pace Estimate

 

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††

 

Great

Good

OK

Marginal

Long Runs

 

 

 

 

 

Number of 20 Milers

3+

3

2

0-1

Pace(seconds > race pace)

30-90

90-120

120-150

<30, >150

Speed Work

 

 

 

 

 

(Intervals, Tempo,Hills,Races)†††

2 per week

1 per week

biweekly

infrequent or

> 2 per week

Strength Work

(Core Strength, Circuits)

1 per week

biweekly

infrequent

never

Pace Work

(5-10 mile run at marathon pace)

2 per week

1 per week

biweekly

infrequent

Highest Weekly Mileage

55 +

45-50

35-40

< 30

Tapering Period

(30% - 40% per week)

3 weeks

2 weeks

2 weeks

1 week

 

Diet

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

high

high

high

low

Carbohydrates

high

high

high

low

Personal Health

 

 

 

 

 

Flu, Cold

none

none

last week

last few days

Injury

none

none

4-6 weeks ago

< 3 weeks ago

Race Day Weather

 

 

 

 

 

High Temperature

40-55

35-40, 55-60

30-35,60-65

<30, >65

Humidity

low

low

med

high

Wind

low-med

low-med

med

high

Rain

none

none-light

med

heavy

Shoes

50-150 miles

last long run

150-300 miles

last long run

300-400

last long run

New shoesor > 400 miles

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Rating

Description

Time Adjustment

Great

No problems. Adjust estimate towards optimal pace.

Down

Good

Slight adjustment towards optimal pace.††††††††

Down Slightly

OK

Should finish OK.Stick with mid-range pace estimate.†††††

Neutral

Marginal

Add lots of time.Adjust estimate towards conservative pace.

Up

 


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 9-22-2008

 

There are 3 weeks to go until the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.We had nice weather for the last 20-mile weekend.Congratulations to all.Youíve made it through some tough training runs.Let the taper begin.

 

Tapering

 

The focus of the next three weeks will be on pace work and rest (cut backs in mileage and intensity).You can also continue with strength workouts and cross-training. The experienced runners should also continue with some limited speed work, and possibly run a predictor 10K race this coming weekend.

 

It has taken 15 weeks of progressively longer and harder workouts to get your body conditioned for the marathon.Take a look back on the mileage progression.It has been build weeks followed by rest weeks.Youíve pushed yourselves harder during the build weeks and then allowed yourself to recover during the rest weeks.Including rest weeks has helped avoid injury and burn-out.

 

The taper is the final rest period.Youíve reached a point of diminishing returns; when the hard training is ending because there is little to be gained from it in the short time before the race.You are where you are in terms of conditioning.Any high-stress workouts that you do in the last two to three weeks are more likely to hurt you than help you on race day.By not allowing for rest, you risk leaving your best efforts out on the training path.†† Youíll go into the marathon fatigued.

 

Check out this article by Bob Cooper for more information on the three week taper.

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/printer/1,7124,s6-238-244-255-5958-0,00.html

 

Race Day Planning

 

Start developing your race day plan.How are you going to get there?If youíre driving, plan on getting there early.Getting into one of the Grant Park garages can take time. Why not take the train? Some of the commuter lines will have special early trains for marathoners.Your family and friends can drive or take the train down later to watch you run.Check out Metraís and CTAís websites.

 

http://www.metrarail.com

 

http://www.transitchicago.com

 

Speaking of family and friends, you should start lining up your support team.You need to identify the exact spots (down to the square foot) on the course where they will meet you.You will then be able to pick them out as you approach.They will almost never be able to pick you out because of the large number of runners.Pick spots on the inside of the course.That way they wonít have to cross in front of runners to get to the meeting spot (an almost impossible task).

 

In addition to a large, obnoxious support sign, have them bring anything you think you might need during the race that isnít provided at the aid stations (energy gels, body glide or Vaseline, band-aids, a change of socks).And finally, let them know where the Illinois Runs tent will be.Thatís where your gear will be and thatís where they should meet you after the race.Stay away from the marathonís family reunion area.Itís a mad-house.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 3

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

9/22/08

9/23/08

9/24/08

9/25/08

9/26/08

9/27/08

9/29/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

28

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

5 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

30

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 8 x 200M Hill

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

12 Miles Easy or 10K Race

Rest or Cross Train

25 to 30

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

12 x 200M Hill

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

10K Race

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

25 to 30

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

16 x 200M Hill

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Rest

10K Race

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

27 to 32

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This is the weekend to run a marathon predictor race.Check out the tips from the week of 9-08-2008 for more information.Next weekís tips will have instructions on how to use your race results to predict a marathon finishing time.

 

If you are racing this weekend, the schedule calls for running a shorter speed workout during the week and skipping the 12-mile run on the weekend.†† If you donít want to miss the 12-mile easy run, then move it to the night that you normally do your speed workout.Skipping the regular speed workout is fine, since the race is considered a speed workout.If you are not racing, then run the easy 12-miler with your regular pace group.

 

The speed workout this week will be an interval workout of short hills. This is the same workout that we did back in week 15.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at long run pace.Take a short rest. Do some light, active stretching.

 

Run 3 sets of 4 x 200 meter hill at 5K race pace.This is a continuous run.At the bottom of the hill you start right into your next uphill repeat.After the fourth repeat, take a 3 minute break.Get water during the break.

 

The veteran marathoners may choose to do a fourth set.

 

End the workout with a one mile cool-down at long run pace.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 9-15-2008

 

Only four weeks to go until the marathon.This is the last build week and itís the toughest.This week-endís 20-miler is the culmination of 15 weeks of hard work.It is also the last chance to effectively practice everything that you plan to do the weekend of the marathon.This includes activities like meals and sleep the few days before the run.Consider this week-endís long run as the last review exercise before the final exam.After the twenty-miler, you should be feeling pretty confident that youíre going to pass the test.Get ready to rest up.ďCrammingĒ in the last few weeks before the marathon is not recommended.

 

Why not 26.2 in Training?

 

A common question from first-timers is: ďWhy donít we run the full 26.2 miles in training?ĒSome runners do, but Illinois Runs only recommends it for the most experienced runners.In fact, some experienced runners may use one marathon as a long training run in preparation for a later marathon.They will run the first marathon at a much slower pace than their normal marathon pace.This allows them to practice everything in a real race environment.

 

As mentioned in previous tips, the drawbacks to running longer (for both weekly mileage and weekend long runs) are injury and being fatigued going into the race.For first-timers, this is especially true.Coming into the 18-week program with their low base-mileage, typical first-timers are not prepared to safely increase their long runs past 20 miles.They would either break down or be hopelessly tired on race day from too many 20-mile-plus training runs.

 

But even for first-timers who are experienced runners or who started their base-building back in January, there are non-physiological reasons for not running the full 26.2 miles in training.

 

Obviously, the primary motivating factor for first-timers, during training and on race day, is to complete the 26.2 mile course.Itís a major accomplishment that will put them in an elite group.Itís what keeps runners going in the last few miles of the marathon.And, crossing the marathon finish line is always a special experience, especially for first-timers.If first-timers complete the full marathon distance in training, then they risk taking away from that race day motivation and experience.Remember the feeling of accomplishment that youíve had each week when you completed yet another long run for a new personal distance record.Well, multiply that by about 100 and thatís how youíre going to feel on race day as you round the turn from Roosevelt Road on to Columbus Drive and approach the finish line.

 

You Know You're A Runner When...

 

Ellen Kuksuk, from last yearís Half Marathon Program, put together the following check list.After weeks and weeks of training, how many items can you relate to?

 

 

  • you've run, showered, and eaten breakfast (twice) before your family/roommates even wake up
  • you have a favorite ice pack
  • you laugh about chaffing
  • you have an exact 'prestart routine' for all runs: the same stretches in the same place for the same amount of time before you take off
  • you buy Gatorade by the truck load
  • you get back from vacation and the first thing you tell people about is how the running was
  • your friends think they need to practice more before they can run with you
  • you call 4 miles an easy day
  • your socks come in two categories: running socks and others
  • you consider pasta to be a food group
  • you have to make a real effort to remember to talk to your (non-running) family and friends about something other than running
  • your boss tells you to go run because your having a bad day at work
  • your non-running family and friends know the differences between feet that are neutral, over-pronating, and supinating
  • you run so much that your family has a separate laundry basket for your running clothes
  • people stop asking you if you are going to run today, but rather ask you when
  • your friends buy sports drinks for their party so you'll have something to drink, since they know you have a run/race the next day
  • you smirk at people who tell you that you run too much or are crazy for enjoying a run
  • you know how to pronounce (correctly) Plantar Fasciitis
  • your friends know that if you don't answer your phone, you're probably running
  • you try to convince people to run a 5k because it's "only" 3 miles
  • you pass on going out with your friends on Friday night because you have to get up early and run
  • you no longer have to explain to your friends why cotton isn't the best choice for running attire
  • you come back after a 1 hour run and your spouse says 'That was fast. I didn't expect you back so soon.'
  • you dream about running
  • your spouse begs you to go for a run because you are in a bad mood
  • you brag about losing toenails

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 4

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

9/15/08

9/16/08

9/17/08

9/18/08

9/19/08

9/20/08

9/21/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

10 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

38

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

6 Miles Easy

Rest

10 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

41

2nd Timer

5 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 8 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 Miles Pace

4 Miles Easy

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

45

Experienced Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

12 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 to 11Miles Pace

5 Miles Easy

20 to 22 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

46 to 53

Veteran Marathoner

7 Miles Easy

16 x Quarter Mile

Rest

10 to 13 Miles Pace

6 Miles Easy

20 to 23 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

49 to 60

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout is 1/4 mile repeats at 5K or mile race pace.This is a shorter workout.You should be able to complete 12 quarters, regardless of your weekly mileage.Veteran Marathoners can run 16.Be careful with the pace though, the rest interval is very short.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up and some stretching.

 

The quarters will be run in 3 sets of 4 repeats.

 

Follow the first, second, and third quarters in each set with a one-minute rest interval.Follow the fourth repeat with a slightly longer rest and a water break, before starting the next set.

 

Finish the workout with a one-mile cool down.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 9-8-2008

 

 

Only five weeks to go until the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.This week is a rest week.†† Next week is the last tough week.Then the three-week taper begins.

 

Fall Racing

 

With your improved conditioning, cooler weather, and some rest you might be tempted to run some shorter races in the next few weeks.Here are a couple of suggestions regarding fall races.

 

Other than the marathon, the Illinois Runs training calendar has only two races scheduled.They are listed as options for the experienced marathoners in the first week of training and two weeks before the marathon.These races are meant to be used as an evaluation of your current fitness level and as predictors of your marathon finishing time.The schedule lists 10K races because they are a fairly reliable predictor.5K races can also be used, but they are less reliable.Longer races like the half-marathon are reliable predictors, but they are harder on your body and require more recovery time.This can interfere with your training schedule and even lead to an injury.

 

The Racing and Training Pace chart in the I-Run workbook can be used to estimate your marathon finishing time based on a 5K, 10K, or half-marathon race time.There will be more information on using the results of your predictor race in another set of tips, closer to the marathon.

 

At this time of year, there are several races to choose from on any given weekend.The weekend of 9-27-08 and 9-28-08 would be the best weekend to run a predictor 10K.†† You will have already started your taper, so youíll be well rested going into the race.And because there will still be two weeks until the marathon, youíll have plenty of time to recover.Reviewing the racing calendar, here are two local races to consider that week-end.

 

Highland Park District 112 Fun(d) Run (10K), Highland Park, 9-27-08, 8:00 AM

http://www.active.com/page/Event_Details.htm?event_id=1619329&assetId=e4ea9b21-a143-464f-98ac-e41acbaa548b

 

PAWS Chicagoís Run for Their Lives (8K), Chicago, 9-28-07, 9:00 AM

http://pawschicago.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=272373

 

If neither of these races is convenient for you, check the calendar for a 5K race.Hereís the link to the Chicago Athlete calendar.

 

http://www.chicagoaa.com/calendar/smu.html

 

A 5K or 10K race is your speed workout for the week.You should schedule a rest day before the race and a recovery day after it.Also, running a weekend race will conflict with your long training run.The long run is still your most important workout and shouldnít be skipped.Therefore, if you end up racing, itís recommended that you move the weekend 12-miler to the day on which you normally do your speed workout.

 

The Chicago Half Marathon

 

The Banco Popular Chicago Half Marathon is coming up this weekend.Again, because of the long recovery time, racing a half-marathon during the training season can be risky.Only the most experienced runners should be considering running it all out.Instead of racing it, treat this race as a either your easy long run or your marathon pace run.Use it to practice everything that you plan to do on October 12th.If you use this race as your pace run for the week, then move the easy 12 mile long run that is scheduled for the weekend to earlier in the week.††

 

First Timers

 

As weíve mentioned before, we recommend that you stay away from racing during your training.There will be plenty of time after the marathon to run shorter races.Allowing several weeks of recovery, a November race, like one of the ďturkey trotsĒ, would be about right for you.

 

Once youíve completed the twenty-miler, it will be time to start the taper.Resist the urge to race and enjoy the rest.You will have earned it and you will need it.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 5

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

9/8/08

9/9/08

9/10/08

9/11/08

9/12/08

9/13/08

9/14/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

29

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

6 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

32

2nd Timer

4 Miles Easy

6 Miles Easy or include 6 x Half Mile

Rest

9 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

33 to 34

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

10 x Half Mile

Rest

9 to 10Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

35 to 41

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

12 x Half Mile

Rest

10 to 12 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

40 to 46

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

Itís a rest week, but the speed workout is tough and long:10-12 half-mile repeats at 10K pace.This workout is based on the Yasso 800ís.Check out the description of this workout at the Runners World web site.

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-244-255-624-0,00.html

 

This workout can also be used as a marathon predictor by adding a couple of zeros to end of your average split for the half-mile repeats.For example, if you average 4:00 minutes for your splits, then itís predicted that you should be able to run 4:00:00 (four hours) for the marathon. If you can make it through at least 10 half-mile repeats and youíve been doing okay on your long runs and pace runs, you should feel fairly confident about your marathon target time.

 

We will run a modified version of this workout.The rest interval is shorter and some of the experienced runners may do 12 repeats instead of 10.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at long run pace.Take a short rest and do some light, active stretching.

 

Base the number of half-mile repeats that you run on your weekly mileage.

 

35 miles per week: 6 to 8

36 to 45 miles per week 8 to 10

Over 45 miles per week: 10 to 12

 

Take a 1:30 rest between repeats.Take a slightly longer rest and get water after each set of 4.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 9-01-2008

 

There are 6 weeks to go before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

 

Itís another build week.And this weekendís run will be the first 20-miler for the Second Timers.†† This week and the week after next are the hardest weeks of the program.Thatís why we will sandwich a cut back mileage week between them.

 

Suggestions for the 20 Miler

 

The I-Run Workbook lists several strategies for running the 20-milers.Hereís a brief recap.

 

The first strategy is to run the entire 20 miles at the same slow, comfortable pace that youíve been running all summer.This is the method that will be used by the group leaders.Itís also the method that we recommend for first-timers.

 

The second strategy is to run the 20 miles slow enough so that the entire workout, including water stops, will take the same amount of time that you estimate that it will take you to complete the marathon.As well as training you physiologically, the long run is also preparing you psychologically for the marathon.Doing anything continuously for 3, 4, 5 or 6 hours, including driving, watching TV, and most certainly running, can be mentally challenging.Method 2 will better prepare you mentally for marathon day.Because youíre running slower than you plan to on race day, the physical stress is less and you will be able to recover quickly.If you canít get other runners in your group to try this method, you may want to switch to a slower pace group.

 

The third strategy is designed to simulate how it will feel to maintain your target pace during the later stages of the marathon.This method involves running the first 16-18 miles at the normal easy pace for your group.The last few miles are then run at your target marathon pace.Because the bulk of the miles are done at a slow pace, and youíre only running 20 miles, you will be able to recover quickly.This method should only be used by the experienced marathoners.If you want to experiment with this method, see if other experienced runners in your group would be willing to join you.

 

First Timers, stick with method 1. Run the same pace that youíve been running all year. This should also be the pace at which you plan to run the marathon.Keep your training simple.Focus on finishing safely.You can experiment with some of these other techniques when training for your second marathon.

And donít forget to practice everything that you plan to do on the weekend of the marathon.Have you bought those shoes yet?You should have about 50 - 75 miles on your marathon shoes, including one long run, preferably a 20 miler.

 

Weekend Runs Longer than 20 Miles & Pace Runs Longer than 10 Miles

 

The published training schedules give experienced runners the option of extending the week-end runs past 20 miles and the mid-week pace runs past 10 miles.The obvious reason for extending these workouts is to better prepare for the marathon.This is especially important to runners looking for that optimal marathon.However, there is a breaking point for every runner, no matter how experienced.Running longer on the pace run and the weekend run is a lot like increasing your weekly mileage.There is a training benefit, but there is also the increased risk of injury.

 

The bottom line is we donít recommend extending the long run or pace run unless you are an experienced marathoner with a big mileage base.

 

If you are going to extend these runs, make sure that you are not running faster than the recommended pace.For the long run, that pace should be a comfortable one that is 30 to 90 seconds slower than marathon pace.The pace runs obviously should be run at your target marathon pace.

 

Over training (too many miles, at too fast a pace) can also lead to being over-tired.While you may be fortunate enough to avoid an injury, you may end up wearing yourself down to the point where even the three-week taper prior to the race is not enough time to fully recover from training and to be properly rested for the marathon.So, be careful.You donít want to find out on race day that youíve left your best efforts out on the running path.

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 6

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

9/1/08

9/2/08

9/3/08

9/4/08

9/5/08

9/6/08

9/7/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

18 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

35

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

6 Miles Easy

Rest

9 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

18 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

38

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

7 Miles Easy or include 3 x Mile

Rest

9 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

20 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

40 to 42

Experienced Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

5 x Mile

Rest

9 to 10Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

20 to 21 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

44 to 50

Veteran Marathoner

6 Miles Easy

6 x Mile

Rest

10 to 12 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

20 to 22 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 5 Miles Easy

48 to 56

 

 

 

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be mile repeats that will vary between Lactate Threshold pace and 10K Race Pace.†† Itís getting darker much earlier now.If you are running this workout in the evening, select a course that is well-lit and has good footing.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at an easy pace.Take a short rest. Do some light, active stretching.

 

Mile Repeat 1: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 2: 10K Race Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 3: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 4: 10K Race Pace.2 minutes rest.

Mile Repeat 5: Lactate Threshold Pace.2 minutes rest.

 

Finish with a one-mile cool-down at an easy pace.

 

Base the number of mile repeats you run on your weekly mileage.

 

Low thirties: First 3 repeats.

Mid thirties: First 4 repeats.

Over 40 Miles: All 5 repeats.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 8-25-2008

 

There are 7 weeks to go before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

 

Itís a well earned rest week.Listen to your body.If youíre feeling a little beat up, take extra rest or do more cross-training instead of running.Hydration, good nutrition, sleep, and stretching are now especially critical to staying healthy and injury-free.There are only two more build weeks left, but they are the toughest.†† So really rest this week!††

Labor Day Week-End

 

Labor Day weekend is coming up and many of you may be out of town.Itís one of those weeks when you have to be flexible with your training schedule. As mentioned in earlier tips, the long run and mid-week pace runs are the most important workouts.You need to fit them in with the rest of your activities.††

 

This quote from Bob Glover, author of The Runnerís Handbook and The Competitive Runnerís Handbook, sums it up perfectly.

 

"The single most important ingredient to marathon success is the long run.  "Going long" is a hallowed weekend tradition that is despised and loved, feared and revered, bragged about and complained about.  Whether you like long runs or not, one thing remains clear: You have to run them if you want to maximize your potential on marathon day.  The long run can make you physically and psychologically stronger or it can destroy you, turning running into a painful task.  The long run mirrors the marathon itself: it demands attention and respect.Ē

 

If you canít run with the group on Labor Day week-end then you have a number of options.You can run on your own when youíre out of town. Itís a great way to explore a new area.However, measuring a course, getting water and Gatorade during the run, and just finding a few hours for the run can all be challenging.†††

 

Another option is to move the long run to Thursday or Friday.You can then move the pace run to the week-end.It should be a lot easier to fit in the shorter pace run while youíre out of town.If you plan on doing this, see if someone from your regular group would be willing to run long with you on Thursday or Friday.††

 

If you end up running by yourself, youíll need to make plans for fluid replacement.Choose a course that has water fountains on it.That way, you only need to worry about Gatorade.You can set up your own aid station by dropping off Gatorade ahead of time and then run a loop that allows you to pass the station several times.A better option is to carry Gatorade with you on the run.A belt, such as those from Nathan Sports, allows you to carry water, Gatorade, and gels.The extra weight is evenly distributed around your waist.Check out their web-site for some examples.

 

http://www.nathansports.com/our_products/hydration_nutrition/race_speed.html

 

With any of these options, you could end up running many of the miles by yourself.If at all possible, make it to a scheduled group run on Saturday or Sunday.

Universal Sole Half Marathon

 

The inaugural running of this race is coming up on Labor Day, 8-01-08.Many runners, especially the experienced ones, will be tempted to enter it.Fortunately, it follows a weekend with cut-back mileage.However, racing it will additional stress on your body.There is a 18-20 mile run coming up the following weekend.If you plan to run this race, here are a few recommendations.

 

Treat the race as a long pace run and use it to practice everything that you plan to do on the day of the marathon.The distance of next weekís pace run for the experienced runners is 9 to 10 miles.So, move the mid-week pace run to Monday and substitute a shorter workout in place of the pace run later in the week.Run the first 3 to 4 miles at an easy pace and the rest of the race at your target marathon pace.

 

As mentioned in previous tips, the long runs and mid-week pace runs have now become high-stress workouts.They need to be followed by rest or easy days. So if youíre running the half marathon, do your long run on Saturday, allowing Sunday to be a rest day.Also, if you are running the weekly speed workouts, run a scaled down version of the workout on Tuesday, 9-02-08, or move that workout to later in the week.

 

First Timers

 

Did you ever think that you would consider a 12-mile run to be a cut-back?Youíre conditioning has been improving slowly but surely since June.However, donít get over-confident and try to do too much.Take the rest week seriously.Stay away from racing, no matter how good you feel.††

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 7

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

8/25/08

8/26/08

8/27/08

8/28/08

8/29/08

8/30/08

8/31/08

Total Weekly Miles

1st Timer, Novice Runner

3 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

4 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

27

1st Timer, Exp. Runner

4 Miles Easy

Rest

8 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy

Rest

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

29

2nd Timer

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

5 Miles Easy or include 4 X Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train

29 to 31

Experienced Marathoner

4 Miles Easy

2 x Half Mile, One Mile, 2 x Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 3 Miles Easy

31 to 35

Veteran Marathoner

5 Miles Easy

2 x Half Mile, One Mile, 2 x Half Mile

Rest

8 Miles Pace

Strength & 2-3 Miles Easy

12 Miles Easy

Rest or Cross Train, or 4 Miles Easy

32 to 37

 

 

Experienced & Veteran Marathoners

 

This weekís workout will be a mix of long intervals.It will include a set of Ĺ mile repeats, a one-mile run, and a second set of Ĺ mile repeats.

 

Start with a one-mile warm-up at an easy pace.

 

Follow this with a set of 2 half-miles at 10K pace.Take a 1:30 minute break between repeats.†† Take a 3-minute break after the second half-mile.

 

Next, run one mile at Lactate Threshold (LT) pace.For a quick estimation of your LT pace for one mile, double your earlier half-mile split and add 15 to 20 seconds.Follow the mile with another 3 minute break.

 

Next, run another set of 2 half-miles at 10K pace with a 1:30 minute rest between repeats.

 

Finish the workout with a one-mile cool-down.


Illinois Runs Marathon Training Program

 

Tips for the Week of 8-18-2008

 

There are 8 weeks to go before the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

 

Itís another critical build week.The long run and pace run distances have increased.And itís the first 20-miler for the experienced group.†† Next week weíll cut back on the mileage.

 

Practice, Practice, Practice: Gels, Breakfast, Shoes, Clothing

 

There are only a few long runs left on which to practice and perfect all the things that you plan on doing on race day.Here are a few of those things to consider.

 

Gels & Other Energy Supplements

Youíve already had plenty of practice with the water and Gatorade.If you havenít tried them yet, you should start experimenting with some other energy supplements.Start with Power Gel, since it will be available at 17.75 miles in the marathon.Pay attention to which types contain caffeine.Some of you may want the caffeine, some may not.Youíll need to drink water with each packet, so plan on taking the gels during your water stops.

The new formula Power Gel and E-Gel contain significantly higher levels of sodium than GU, Clif Shots and the other gels on the market.If Gatorade causes you stomach or intestinal distress, these are good options as you can stick with the gels and water only.†† Check out the manufacturer recommendations for use:

http://www.powerbar.com/Products/PowerGel/

http://www.cranksports.com/products/eGel/

Most of you will probably want to start using the gels before mile 17, so you will have to come up with a way of carrying them.Some running shorts come with side pockets or netting.You also can pin the packets to your singlet and then tuck them inside the waistband of your shorts.If itís not uncomfortable for you, a fanny pack can be used.

Some runners prefer something more solid like Power Bars or hard candy.Some of the aid stations during the marathon will also offer bananas.What ever you decide on, you need to practice taking it on the long training runs.Some runners will stick with just Gatorade.Thatís fine.Just donít decide on marathon day to try something that you havenít tested on a long run.

Start the marathon with enough gels to get you to mile 17 and then use the Power Gel station to replenish your supply.Obviously, if you choose a supplement other than Power Gel, then youíll need to bring that supplement to the race.

Breakfast

 

The marathon will start at 8:00 AM.Thatís at least an hour later than the start of the training runs.If youíve been skipping breakfast before the training runs but plan on eating breakfast on race day, then you need to start eating breakfast before your long runs now.Some runners in our group actually get up early in the morning (3 or 4 am), eat breakfast, and then go back to bed.This gives them a couple of hours between eating and running.†† Stick with something light (plain toast, bagel, banana).

 

Shoes

 

Sometime in the next few weeks, youíll need to purchase the shoes in which you will run the marathon.Unless youíve experienced problems with your current pair of shoes, you should stick with the same model.Youíll want them to be broken in and tested, but youíll also want them to be fairly fresh for the race.At a minimum, start using the new pair on some shorter runs and then use them for the last 20-mile run.

 

Clothing and Chafing

 

Over long distances, the constant rubbing of your clothing on your skin will cause chafing in several areas.Wear clothing that is designed for running.This clothing is made of light weight, breathable, synthetic materials that wick moisture away from body.Also apply Body Glide to areas that are likely to chafe.Generic petroleum jelly works also, but it can stain your clothing.

 

Hereís a note from Keith Kijek, the site coordinator at the Niles location.Itís for the men only.

 

ďOver the past couple of weeks we have had a few situations of the bleeding nipple syndrome.  Most of you have not experienced that, but may have had some tenderness in that area.  Now is the time to work on prevention.  Over the next few weeks with our increasing mileage, the heat and high humidity things are only going to get worse.  No matter how soft that shirt may feel at the start you add constant motion and perspiration and it becomes sandpaper on your chest.  They are several ways to combat this:  Body Glide (applied very generously), band aids (the type designed to stick in wetness) and Nip Guards.  Different methods work for different people so now is the time to experiment not on marathon day."

 

Suggested Weekly Training Schedule

 

Below are suggested workout schedules for the five types of marathon runners for this week.

 

Week 8

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

Type of Runner

8/18/08

8/19/08

8/20/08

8/21/08

8/22/08

8/23/08

8/24/08